The Netherlands: Food                                            

In the Netherlands you'll find excellent seafood and fish dishes—especially oysters and herring—which are popular street foods. You’ll find marvelous cheeses and delicious pea soup that is usually served in the winter.

Broodjes

If you need a quick sandwich, go to a shop offering broodjes.

Vlaamse frites

In many cities, French fries are sold on street corners. The best are called vlaamse frites (Flemish fries) which are served with mayonnaise.

Automatiek
Strolling around the larger towns, you may notice little food shops called automatiek. They are much like a fresh-food vending machine. For a few euros, you can taste an egg roll, a hamburgers or fries. The food is surprisingly good.

Rijsttafel
The word means “rice table” and is a dinner with many small dishes consisting of traditional Indonesian foods. Expect to find spicy fish, meat, vegetables and fruit all served with various sauces.

Indonesian Dishes
Popular Indonesian dishes are nasi goreng (fried rice), bami goreng (fried noodles) and gado gado (steamed vegetables with a spicy peanut sauce).

Roti kip

Roti kip is a curried chicken served with potatoes, long beans, bean sprouts and a thin chickpea-flour pancake from Suriname.

Uitsmijters

Uitsmijters is an open sandwich with bread, butter, ham, cheese and two fried eggs.

Hutsput

Hutsput is a stew of potatoes, carrots, onions and beef.

Frikandel

Frikandel is shaped like a hot dog, but doesn’t taste like it at all. However, it’s really good.

Bitterballen

Bitterballen is similar to meatballs, but with different ingredients and spices.

Poffertjes

Poffertjes are like miniature pancakes and are loved by all. They are sometimes sold in the street at markets and are served with powdered sugar.

Hopjes, Dropjes and Zuurtjes

Hopjes, Dropjes and Zuurtjes are little hard candies that come in all shapes, colors and flavors.

Herring

Herring is very popular and is sold at street stands.

Pannekoeken

Pannekoeken are more like French crêpes than US American pancakes. They're much larger (though thinner) than their North American counterparts. They are light and thin and served on especially large plates. They are topped with various fruits or meats. They are usually eaten for lunch or for dessert. Here is a recipe to try at home:

Ingredients

500 grams of wheat flour

1 liter of milk

4 medium eggs

1 tsp salt

1 tbsp oil or butter

1 tsp sugar

Put flour in a bowl and make a little hole in the middle. Pour some milk in the hole and start stirring. Gradually pour in all the milk, making a smooth batter. Mix in the eggs, one by one, add salt, sugar and oil and mix again until the batter is smooth and not lumpy. Don’t over mix or the pancakes will be rubbery!

The pancakes should be cooked in a large, wide frying pan (a French crêpe pan will work) in butter (or oil). The butter should be very hot. Pour in about 2 or 3 tablespoons of batter and cook. Turn the pancake when the upper surface is dry and cook the reverse side for approximately the same amount of time.

You can use anything you like as a filling. Use your imagination! Classic fillings are bacon and syrup or apple pancakes.

For the bacon pancakes, you have to fry the bacon first and then place on the pancake. These are typically served with Dutch syrup, which has a thicker consistency than US American maple syrup.

For the apple pancakes, first bake some fine chunks of apple and then pour over the batter. Syrup or sugar and cinnamon can be used to sweeten apple pancakes.

Smakelijk!!!