France: Did you know?                                            

  • French children learn that the rooster’s call is, “Cocorico.”

  • The French usually eat a small breakfast consisting of French bread (baguette), jam (confiture) and/or butter (beurre), and coffee (café) or chocolate milk (chocolat au lait). On Sundays, for a special treat, plain or chocolate croissants may replace baguettes.

  • In the past, the most important meal of the day was lunch and many families gathered in the afternoon, returning home from work, to enjoy a large meal.

  • Formal meals often consist of five courses: appetizer, soup, main dish, salad, cheese, and dessert.

  • France is a land of castles. The Loire Valley among others has hundreds of castles and palaces that can be visited.

  • The Tour de France is a famous road bike race that lasts three weeks and takes place in the summer. Racers bike 3,500 kilometers (2,200 miles) over mountains and flatlands rain or shine. Sometimes the Tour de France goes into neighboring countries like Belgium. Each year, a new route is planned.

  • There are several dialects spoken in France, including Breton, Langue d’Oc, and Alsatian (a German dialect).

  • The French generally enjoy sports and some of their favorites include: football (soccer), tennis and boules (photo). Boules is often played in public parks by older, retired men. It is a bit like bowling but without the pin.

  • Some French food delicacies include: snails, frog legs, horse, moldy cheese, cow tongue, pig ears, blood sausage and wild boar. Mmm…. 

  • The US Statue of Liberty, officially called Liberty Enlightening the World (La Liberté Éclairant le Monde), was given to the US by France to represent the friendship the two countries established during the US Revolution. It was inaugurated on October 28, 1886 and is a monument commemorating the centennial of the signing of the US Declaration of Independence. A miniature version of the Statue of Liberty can be found in Paris.